Wayne's World

Actions

After over six decades on the job, this woman is still not ready to leave the hospital

After over six decades on the job, this woman is still not ready to leave the hospital
Posted at 11:33 PM, Jun 29, 2022
and last updated 2022-06-29 23:33:30-04

RICHMOND, Va. -- Walk inside any hospital and it's easy to spot people who are dedicated to their jobs.

But inside Johnston Willis Hospital, in a place where few eyes can see, is someone whose career has spanned over six decades.

Annie Macklin knows a little something about time. She has attended the same church since she was nine years old.

She has been married to her first and only true love for 58 years.

"At 15, I met my husband. He bought my whole outfit to wear and everything, so you know, we were kinda down," Macklin said.

A few weeks later after marrying her husband at 16, she got a job at the hospital.

"I did trays, I worked in the cafeteria, cooked, helped the cook and did everything."

When she began her job in 1961, John F. Kennedy was president. Segregation still existed, but Annie saw things differently.

"I never got upset over stuff like that because I said, people is people and all of us came from that blood of Jesus Christ," Macklin said. "If you was nice to me, then I was nice to you. If I couldn't get along with you, then I just go on about my business, you know?"

Her philosophy on life has served her well.

"My husband used to say, you're too nice, people are going to take advantage of you. But so far, I've been here 70 some years, still striving, you know."

At 77, she continues to make a name for herself in the hospital.

"So I don't know, I'm a workaholic or what is it but my family, they fuss all the time because they want me to stop but I feel like if I stop, it's no use, too much that I can do. I work in the church a lot."

Slowing down isn't something that Macklin is considering, especially after mastering the hospital kitchen.

Back in the 1980s, at a time that many her age would be planning their retirement, Annie set a goal to finish something she started decades before.

Working during the day, Annie went to school at night to earn her GED.

"Because I figured everybody should at least do high school if they don't do anything else," Macklin said.

As the years rolled into decades, Annie has seen the world and the hospital kitchen change.

She remembers through the years when the cafeteria was filled with people coming just to eat their food.

"Saturday and Sunday, they come for breakfast, lunch and supper."

Now in the twilight of a distinguished career, Annie has no thought of not walking through the doors to come to work.

"I just have to have something to do."

Now, after 61 years, not many people can say they have Annie Macklin's viewpoint when it comes to working.

"I love working with sick people and making people happy. And food makes people happy, you know that."