NewsLocal News

Actions

Richmond Fire rescues 19 people from cars amid flash floods

Richmond Fire rescues 19 people from cars amid flash floods
Richmond Fire rescues 19 people from cars amid flash floods
Richmond Fire rescues 19 people from cars amid flash floods
Richmond Fire rescues 19 people from cars amid flash floods
Posted at 10:14 PM, Jun 09, 2021
and last updated 2021-06-10 09:22:22-04

RICHMOND, Va. -- Nineteen people were rescued from their vehicles after getting trapped in high water in Wednesday afternoon's flash floods, according to the Richmond Fire Department.

Amy Vu, Richmond Fire Department Spokesperson, said the Water Rescue Team helped those people get to safety.

Photos she posted show just how quickly conditions can change.

A photo taken around 4:30 p.m. at East 31st and Maury streets on Richmond's Southside showed cars surrounded by rising waters as strong storms dumped inches of rain. Another photo taken just 50 minutes later showed how quickly the water had receded.

Vu said Maury Street saw the most activity Wednesday afternoon, but across South Richmond, water rescue teams rushed to the aid of trapped vehicles in high water.

Meanwhile along Commerce Road, Warren Hubbard with 'On Time Towing' said he spent his off time helping to pull cars from the median and street amid high water.

"I see cars on medians, people just flying past 'em, cars aren't stopping," said Hubbard. "It was just, 'wow, let me try to help. I have a tow truck; I know how to drive it."

Hubbard wasn't the only one offering a helping hand.

Chris Quidort said he left his home near Hopkins and Walmsley since they had no power. On his way to get gas, he saw cars stuck along Commerce Road.

"Came across a couple of stalled out vehicles and another Good Samaritan and we pushed the stalled vehicle out of the travel lane," said Quidort.

With the arrival of hurricane season, and more storms probable, Morgan Dean, Spokesperson for AAA Mid-Atlantic said Wednesday's fast-moving storm was a reminder to prepare your car before you hit the road, use caution while driving, and never drive through high water.

"Twelve inches of water can carry away most cars," said Dean. "If you're going out in the rain, and it's a deluge like we saw today. Slow down, increase that following distance with the vehicle in front of you, brake early, and drive with extra caution."

Dean also emphasized the importance of avoiding distractions in these conditions and moving over a lane if you see flashing lights or crews on the side of the road.