NewsLocal News

Actions

Unlicensed motorcyclist clocked at 100 mph ‘split the lane’ on state trooper, police say

Posted at 3:38 PM, Aug 03, 2015
and last updated 2015-08-04 06:53:43-04

CHESTERFIELD COUNTY, Va. -- Everyday new bikers work to get their motorcycle license under trained professionals like Gail Dabney at the Motorcycle Safety Center of Virginia in Ashland.

But, Dabney said “a lot of folks ride around, still, illegally.”

Monday a chase started when a man split the lane on I-95 and zoomed past a Virginia State Police cruiser. When the trooper turned on his lights and siren, the 2004 Suzuki 600 motorcycle sped off at 100 miles an hour, investigators said.

"At speeds in excess of 100 mph, the motorcycle exited I-95 to Chippenham Parkway. The pursuit concluded in a parking lot in the 5700 block of Hopkins Road, where the motorcyclist was taken into custody without incident," Virginia State Police spokesman Sgt. Steve Vick said.

28-year-old D'Quan L. Hill, of Chester, is accused of splitting the lane going over 100 mph.

28-year-old D'Quan L. Hill, of Chester, is accused of splitting the lane going over 100 mph.

The motorcyclist, 28-year-old D'Quan L. Hill, of Chester, was charged with one count of possession with Intent to Distribute Cocaine, one felony count of eluding police, reckless driving (135/60 mph zone), unsafe lane change, expired inspection, and no motorcycle endorsement/license.

He was being held without bond at Chesterfield Jail.

After hearing about Hill’s arrest, Dabney said his alleged behavior on the road is “definitely not what to do.”

“It’s just shocking someone would go that fast in an open environment like the interstate with other cars around,” Dabney said.

Dabney said bikers are allowed to pass cars in between lanes in California to increase traffic flow in highly congested areas at slow speeds, but not in Virginia.

Gail Dabney

“It’s just shocking someone would go that fast in an open environment like the interstate with other cars around,” Dabney said.

“What does it do to the other drivers?  They’re shocked when somebody does it, so now they’re trying to get away from the motorcyclist they may go into other lanes of traffic which makes it more dangerous,” Dabney said.

She said if drivers see a motorcyclist coming up behind them at a high rate of speed, and then pass them in between lanes, they should “maintain their path of travel, which means keep going where they are going at the same speed so that at least the motorcyclist knows they’re going to go around them.”